Liberal Advice on How to Stop a Sexual Attack

Yesterday, I posted about Ken Toltz, the founder of Safe Campus Colorado, and his intent to ban concealed carry on campus even if it means taking away most womens’ only true/reliable form of self-defense during an attack. 

I then started wondering, ok well if guns are taken away from these females, what do they expect them to do in the event that they are a victim of a sexual assault? 

Here are some “preventative tips” given to help prevent yourself from being a victim of an attack:

What To Do If You Are Attacked

These tips are designed to help you protect yourself on campus, in town, at your home, or while you travel.  These are preventative tips and are designed to instruct you in crime prevention tactics.

1. Be realistic about your ability to protect yourself.

2. Your instinct may be to scream, go ahead!  It may startle your attacker and give you an opportunity to run away.

3. Kick off your shoes if you have time and can’t run in them.

4. Don’t take time to look back; just get away.

5. If your life is in danger, passive resistance may be your best defense.

6. Tell your attacker that you have a disease or are menstruating.

7. Vomiting or urinating may also convince the attacker to leave you alone.

8. Yelling, hitting or biting may give you a chance to escape, do it!

9. Understand that some actions on your part might lead to more harm.

10. Remember, every emergency situation is different.  Only you can decide which action is most appropriate.”

 

Let’s go through these:

1- “Be realistic about your ability to protect yourself”. EXACTLY. I am being realistic about my ability to fight off an attacker (possibly multiple attackers) which is why I choose to arm myself with a weapon I can rely on. I can kick, scream, punch, and bite all I want but in the end, men are stronger than women. 

2- “Your instinct may be to scream. Go ahead! It may startle your attacker and give you the opportunity to run.” MAY being the key word here. It MAY startle your attacker. That’s no guarantee. And just because he is thrown off or startled for one second, doesn’t mean he won’t come running after you if you try to escape, covering your mouth the second time around. 

3- “Kick off your shoes if you have time and can’t run in them”. Great, so you’re best option for me is to run away screaming? How on earth is that protecting yourself?

4- “Don’t take time to look back, just get away”. Yes, because it is just so easy to get away from someone who is intentionally trying to harm you. This tip is assuming you’ve already escaped their grasp. Ok, so what do you do if you haven’t?

5- “If your life is in danger, passive resistance may be your best defense”. Well that’s interesting. So you are recommending that these women take a non-violent approach and refuse to cooperate? That makes a lot of sense, because you know every girl wants to cooperate and be a victim of rape. (This sentence is oozing with sarcasm just in case that isn’t obvious). Basically what I get out of reading this is “Don’t struggle or fight, just let him rape you”. Sick.

6- “Tell your attacker you have a disease or are menstruating”. Please show me a situation in which this actually worked. Most rapes are thought out and planned by someone the victim knows. Don’t you think they would have already taken these possibilities into consideration before the attack? Not to mention, if someone wants to harm you, threatening them with your period isn’t going to do much good. 

7- “Vomiting or urinating also may convince the attacker to leave you alone”. There’s that key word again. ‘May’ implying that there is a chance this won’t stop your attacker. It’s like this advice is coming from sea creatures or toads. Peeing on yourself is not a self-defense mechanism! Not to mention, there are only so many times that you can use the restroom and some people are too pre-occupied or scared to vomit on demand. Let’s just embarrass and degrade the poor girl while you’re at it. 

8- “Yelling, hitting, or biting may give you a chance to escape, do it!” This isn’t always an option. What if your attacker comes up from behind and pins you down? Yelling won’t do you much good if no one is around. Plus, try and tell me that victims of rape in the past didn’t do everything in their physical power to stop the attack. Could it possibly help? Sure, but a lot of the time, hitting and biting will not phase the attacker due to the high levels of adrenaline. 

9- “Understand that some actions on your part might lead to more harm”. Yes, and the opposite applies as well. Lack of action may also cause you more harm. 

10- “Remember, every emergency situation is different. Only you can decide which action is more important“.That has got to be my favorite line, especially being that it is coming from a liberal. So basically they are saying you have the right to decide which action is most appropriate in these situations, yet they want to tell you that you can’t have a gun? Wait a second, I though ONLY I COULD DECIDE WHICH ACTION IS MORE IMPORTANT? But I guess that doesn’t count because THAT action doesn’t meet their standards. 

 

Even if these recommendations end one attack, it doesn’t end the intent of the criminal for good. That means he can come back and do the same thing to someone else, someone else who might not be so lucky to get away. I don’t want to rely on forcing myself to vomit or urinate in order to save my life. I don’t want to ever have to live with the fact that a rapist would be out to harm another girl because all I did was pee on myself. I’ll stick with my gun. That way my life will be saved along with future women who may have encountered the same attacker. 

Carry concealed, ladies. Your attacker won’t know what hit him. 

Founder of Safe Campus Colorado Believes Arming Women Won’t Stop Sexual Assault

Ken Toltz, the founder of Safe Campus Colorado, is pushing to ban concealed carry permits on college campuses because he doesn’t believe it would help a female stop an attacker.

According to Toltz, “Addressing the prevalence and risk of campus sexual assault shouldn’t be tied into a concealed gun issue,”

It’s separate and politicizes something that we’re not doing enough about. The statistics are really worrisome about how prevalent sexual assault is on college campuses. We’re not doing enough, and handing out guns is not the solution.”

Toltz would like to start a discussion on how to prevent and respond to sexual assault without the use of guns on campus. However, Amanda Collins, a student at a college campus in Nevada, strongly disagrees.

I think everyone would agree that more needs to be done to prevent sexual assaults, however campus carry isn’t trying to prevent sexual assaults. It’s about allowing women to be able to protect their bodies and preserve their lives if they find themselves in that situation, which they continually do.

Part of her argument is that carrying guns on campus was never meant to PREVENT sexual assault, but instead give women an opportunity to respond to the attacker in a way that could save their life. Her testimony is that her concealed gun stopped her from being a victim of sexual assault.

The sad truth is that 20% of college females are victims of a sexual assault attack on their campus. These women who have been sexually assaulted in the past DESERVE to feel safe, protected, and less vulnerable. They have a right to protect themselves from harm, yet Ken Toltz believes that taking away guns is the answer to preventing more women from being attacked.

Here are some statistics regarding rape and sexual assault on college campuses:

  • At least 1 in 4 college women will be the victim of a sexual assault during her academic career. Hirsch, Kathleen (1990)”Fraternities of Fear: Gang Rape, Male Bonding, and the Silencing of Women.” Ms., 1(2) 52-56.
  • At least 80% of all sexual assaults are committed by an acquaintance of the victim. Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2001.
  • 48.8% of college women who were victims of attacks that met the study’s definition of rape did not consider what happened to them rape. Bureau of Justice Stats. “Sexual Victimization of Collegiate Women” 2000, US DOJ.
  • More than 70% of rape victims knew their attackers, compared to about half of all violent crime victims.Dennison, Callie. Criminal Victimization 1998. Bureau of Justice Stats, DOJ.
  • There are 35.3 incidents of sexual assault per 1,000 female students on a campus as recorded over a 6.91 month period (the academic year of ‘96 – ’97) as reported in the 2000 DOJ Bureau of Justice Statistics report “The Sexual Victimization of College Women.”
  • On average, at least 50% of college students’ sexual assaults are associated with alcohol use Abbey et al., 1996a, 1998; Copenhaver and Grauerholz, 1991; Harrington and Leitenberg, 1994; Presley et al., 199). Koss (1988),Within the study’s nationally represented sample of college students the results found that 74% of perpetrators and 55% of rape victims had been drinking alcohol prior to the assault.
  • In a survey of high school students, 56% of girls and 76% of boys [some of whom may be incoming college freshmen] believed forced sex was acceptable under some circumstances. Acquaintance Rape: The Hidden Crime, 1991.

Toltz’s attempt last year failed but this year, he seems more optimistic that enough signatures will be on his petition upon review by the Secretary of State by June 30. Toltz did not explain why his group is pushing a ban that will disarm law-abiding female gun owners who go through an extensive personal background check before being issued a concealed carry permit for self-defense. Also, he did not disclose any so-called ‘better recommendations’ to prevent sexual assault.

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I hope and pray that this movement fails and females will be permitted to continue to carry on campus.