Should Women Purchase Pink Guns?

I guess my constant Google searches and endless hours of looking at guns for sale has finally caught up to me. I am getting emails, tweets, phone calls, and Pinterest links sent to me with “Girly Guns”.

I have to say I have some mixed feelings about the bedazzled and painted guns that seem to only target female gun owners on the web and in stores. Because of these feelings, I have tried to think of why I like and dislike the idea of having a pink gun or something covered in rhinestones. I have also tried to look into why it is women are interested in these designs.

What about Pink? Just in case lol

I believe that a lot of women (not all) search for guns that look ‘less scary’. Picking up a small pink gun the size of your hand almost doesn’t register in your brain that you are holding a deadly weapon. Which makes me wonder- if you aren’t recognizing it as a dangerous weapon, would your attacker? This is one of the reasons that I have a bit of hesitation in purchasing a decorated gun. I don’t ever want to give my attacker any indication that I am not serious about defending myself or that my weapon is “too girly” to do any harm to a man, even if that isn’t true.

The next reason I think that women flock to these guns is because they are more ‘fashionable’ or ‘pretty’. To me, a gun is not something you sport around on your hip just to look good or feel pretty. Carrying a gun is serious business and needs to be treated like such. The other thing that I am confused about is a lot of these guns are meant for concealed carry. If you are meaning to keep it hidden from someone, then why choose a weapon designed to stick out? Now some women wear a TON of pink. In that case, I guess a pink concealed carry gun is probably a good choice. In the case that you are trying to hide in a dark corner somewhere, I have some concerns that a bright colored or bedazzled gun may give away my position if light catches it.

Another reason women lean towards this purchase is because it shows men that “this isn’t my husbands gun, it’s mine”. I have talked to a lot of women who feel empowered by having a gun that is unmistakably their’s. Heck, more power to them.

Let me dig a little deeper here. It’s not the little pink and black handguns that really bother me. It is more the “My Little Pony” and the “Hello Kitty” guns that I can’t stand.

Pink Savage Rascal Rifle .22 girl's rifle Accutrigger Unicorn

Bad Kitty for all the Bad ladies

Another issue I have with these is they look like toys. If something looks like a toy, it is pretty much assumed that it will be treated like a toy. If not by you, then possibly by a child. That being said, if not taught by their parents, any child could pick up a gun thinking it’s a toy.

Now to my biggest issue. I think that the way pink guns are being marketed towards women is a bit ridiculous, and quite frankly I think that is the main reason they bother me. It’s as if some believe women are only attracted to the style and color of the weapon and not to the fact that it’s a firearm. There has been one occasion where I was looking at a gun and was encouraged to go with the pink gun instead of a black one. To me, I felt like the man thought that I knew nothing about guns and would want that one just because it’s ‘pretty’. I then asked him “why this one over that one?” while pointing at the PX4 I had been wanting. He starred at me for a couple of seconds and then said “well because this one is popular with our female customers”. Wrong answer dude. Someone once phrased it “It’s as if I was looking at a car and the salesmen shows me the vanity mirror with pretty lights when I was about to ask a question about the engine”. That is exactly how I felt. I mean seriously now, guys do you have this problem? I don’t think so.

Finally, I feel like a lot of the negativity that goes towards pink guns is one of the main reasons that I haven’t considered purchasing one. Why do a lot of  the guys tend to laugh at the women who walk into a range with an ‘unmanly gun’? I surely don’t want to fall into this stereotype that women are weak and can’t own a ‘real’ gun. On the other hand, how would it make these guys feel having this pink gun wind up in the evidence tray for their case after getting shot? Yea.. I don’t think they’d feel too good about that one.

All in all, I have come to the conclusion that it’s just a color.  It by no means determines whether or not a woman is weak. It by no means takes away from the damage that the gun can do. Heck, it’s a ‘man’ gun with a coat of paint on top of it. Now will I ever purchase a pink gun? Probably not. Pink isn’t really my thing. But will I NEVER buy any colored gun? I wouldn’t go that far. This Tiffany Blue rifle is pretty cool 🙂

Tiffany POF and M&P

 

 

Selecting A Handgun: Women’s Perspective

I think it’s a pretty decent video for women who are looking to purchase a handgun. It’s always good to do your research to figure out exactly what you’re looking for. Also, ALWAYS shoot the gun before you purchase it. Most shooting ranges will have rentals that you can use to make sure that the gun you are shooting is comfortable for you.

Recent Gun Laws Push Gun Makers To The South

Big name gun makers like Beretta, Remington, Ruger, Kahr, and more have about had  it with the anti-second amendment gun laws passing is states in which their headquarters are located. These firearm industries are looking to move to more ‘Constitution friendly’ states, taking their guns, jobs, and money with them.

Remington announced this past February that they would be building a new firearms production plant in Huntsville, AL. This plant is foreseen to create 2,000 jobs within the next decade.

We considered numerous factors in our decision-making process. These factors included, among others, labor quality, pro-business environment, strong existing infrastructure and pro-Second Amendment policies.

-Teddy Novine, director of public affairs for Freedom Group Inc., the parent company of Remington

One of the major reasons for Remington’s relocation is due to New York’s recent passing of the Safe Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement (SAFE) Act in wake of the shootings in Newton, CT. The SAFE Act bans the ownership of AR-15 style rifles in the state, which would be unfortunate for Remington. You’d think that in light of Remington creating 1300+ jobs in NY, they would be looking to promote the industry, but instead they’re doing the exact opposite.

Beretta USA is another company that has decided to expand into gun friendly states. Their headquarters is currently located in Maryland. They have announced that they will be building a $45 million production plant in Tennessee. This will create 300 more jobs.

Finding a state that supported the Second Amendment did play a sizable role in our search. There were several factors, one of which was a strong level of support for constitutional rights.”

Ryan Muety, spokesman for Beretta USA. 

Private Sector Businesses are what is driving economic growth in Maryland. Beretta USA has created over 36,000 jobs since December of 2012.

PTR is another. However, unlike Beretta USA and Remington, they will not be keeping their headquarters in the same place. PTR Industries announced last June that they would be uprooting all operations from Bristol, CT and moving to Aynor, SC. This move was completed in January of this year and is estimated to employ over 120 people by July 2017.

Ruger announced this past July that they will be building a production plant in Mayodan, NC.

Kahr is currently headquarted in Pearl River, NY. This is about to change very soon as well. With the purchase of more than 600 acres in Blooming Grove Township, PA, Kahr Arms plans on moving its corporate headquarters and research and development arm to Pennsylvania in the first phase of expansion.

I don’t think I have to say it when taking into account the information I provided above, but just in case you need to look at it from a different angle. This industry helps provide WELL PAYING jobs to American citizens. What do you think is going to happen if your crazy gun-control laws get passed in every state? It will leave thousands of people without a job and it will severely damage the US economy.

Not only is gun ownership beneficial to US citizens in a protection stand point, but it also substantially helps our economy. The firearms industry was responsible for almost $38 billion total economic activity in the United States just last year. That is a 97% increase from 2008.

Let’s also take a look at the impact this industry has had on a national level as well as within your own state:

Looking specifically in the states I mentioned above, can you imagine what their economy will look like within the next 10 years after this companies have up and moved away? Here is the economic impact of the firearms industry in 2013. These states have passed stricter gun control laws, resulting in major firearm production companies

• New York: $2.1 billion

• Connecticut: $1.9 billion

• Massachusetts: $1.6 billion

• Colorado: $825 million

• Maryland: $511 million

So before you go spouting off non-sense on why you think we should have gun control, my past two posts show why that’s a HORRIBLE idea.

1) Ruins the economy

2) Takes well-paying jobs away from hard-working American citizens

3) Increases violent crime and gun homicide

Women’s Only NRA First Steps Pistol Part 2: First time at a shooting range

After day one of gun safety in the lecture room, our day 2 was heading out to SharpShooter’s Small Arms Range and learning how to shoot. I arrived a little early and decided to look at a couple of different guns. I was advised not to purchase without testing them out first but decided I would save that for a different day. 

My instructor arrived and got me set up with my eye and ear protection. I expected gun shots but nothing prepared me for what I was going to hear once I stood behind the firing line. I was definitely jumpy at first but that wore off once I focused on watching each of the shooters. While my instructor was getting the different guns and bullets ready, I enjoyed watching how each person stood, aimed, and recovered. 

I then went back over to my instructor to see what I needed to do. She had 2 different .22’s laid out and told me to hold both to see which one felt better. I had the choice between a Ruger and a Browning. The Ruger felt awkward in my hands so I decided to go with the Browning. She first had me shoot from a Bench Position and then we moved to 2-handed standing and 1-handed standing. Shooting was easy with no recoil and a smooth trigger. However, in the 20 rounds that I shot with this gun I encountered both a misfire and a jam. Not exactly what I would call reliable but I was almost glad that it happened so that I will know what to expect if this ever happens to me again in the future. 

ImageBench Position- Browning .22

 

Image

2-handed standing- Browning .22

 

Image

1-handed standing- Browning .22

After a few rounds of shooting with the .22, we then moved to shooting a 9mm Glock 19 3rd Generation. The Glock was a little too big for my hand and I felt as though the slanted frame was preventing me from getting a good grip. One of the reasons that I like the grip and feel of either a Baretta PX4 Storm or a 9mm Sig. 

 

Image

 

2-handed and 1-handed (circled) standing- 9mm Glock 19 G3

I have to say, I feel I did pretty well. There were a few shots that I missed the black target but all of my shots were on the paper. 

So to conclude my past 2 posts, I would really recommend that women take the NRA First Steps Pistol class for women. If you are in the Virginia area, I really encourage you to go through Virginia Gun Safety for any NRA classes. The instructors are really great and are extremely helpful. I am excited for my next practice and will be looking to purchase my first handgun within the next couple of months.