Hornady designs a gun safe that is both sturdy and affordable

Hornady designs a sturdy, yet affordable, gun safe option that is ideal for concealed carry holders. Watch this open box review!

One of the biggest priorities when owning a handgun is making sure that it is properly secured at all times. When your weapon is neither holstered nor needed, the best place for it is in a gun safe that is easily accessible.

New gun safes with fancy finger print keypads, internal alarms, and GPS tracking are really great products, but are not always the practical option in terms of price. Hornady has designed the TriPoint Gun Safe that is both sturdy and affordable.

Watch this open box review of the Hornady TriPoint Lock Box.

Good Guy With A Gun Stops Carjacking and Saves Woman

A Georgia gun owner is labeled a hero after stopping a car thief and saving the life of the woman clinging to the hood.

Georgia Gun Owner Stops Carjacking and Saves Life [VIDEO]

Screenshot of surveillance recording via YouTube/DailyMailVideosAR1

 A Georgia concealed carry permit holder put a stop to an attempted carjacking at the Fast Track Car Wash in Smyrna on Friday afternoon.

While the victim was vacuuming her vehicle, a teenage male came out of a red van parked next to her and attempted to drive away with her car. The suspect began to speed up after the owner of the white Honda jumped onto the hood with the intent of stopping him from driving away. A Smyrna, Georgia city worker was passing by and drew his gun.

View the surveillance video and the full post here.

Well Armed Woman: Concealed Carry Holsters

As I mentioned in an article last week, I am interested in joining my local Well Armed Woman chapter.

I contacted the chapter leader and was immediately excited. Why? Because this particular meeting was going to be about picking a concealed carry holster. Since I have reached a point in my training that I feel comfortable enough to carry concealed, I am all about learning more about holsters. There are so many options out there and honestly, I didn’t know where to start. I was concerned about spending lots of money only to find that the holster I selected is not what I want. After going to this meeting, that concern was validated and I am very glad that I waited.

When I arrived, I was immediately greeted by the chapter leader. I signed in and went straight into the room. A brief introduction was made by a female range instructor, followed by some Q&A time. We were then set free in the room to try on all of the different types of holsters.

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There were 4 tables set up with different sizes and shapes of holsters. The instructors were there to offer advice/information regarding material, which belts to use, and where to place a weapon you’re trying to conceal.

As we all know, concealing a weapon on a woman is significantly harder for women then it is for men. We have tighter clothes, smaller pockets, and items of clothing with thinner material. One of the very first things we can rule out is pocket holsters. I can hardly fit my car keys in my pocket, let alone a 9mm handgun.

Next, we determined that any holster that does not fully cover the trigger/trigger guard on your weapon is not exactly a safe choice. Not only can clothing zippers and strings get caught on it and pull, but it also gets the shooter in a bad habit of immediately placing their finger on the trigger before removing the gun.

We also discussed the pros and cons of having a ‘snap’ over of your gun to hold it in your holster. This not only makes it hard for someone to take your gun, but it also provides an extra step for you to take when you’re already in a bad situation. The instructor showed 2 alternative options. One holster was specifically made for her gun which allowed it to lock in tightly. The second option had a latch that you can to push forward in order to release the gun from the holster. This, in my opinion, was a great holster.

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As I made my rounds from table to table, I tried on both leather holsters, Kydex holsters, and a combination of Kydex and leather. The fully leather holsters were a little unsturdy when faced with the weight of the handgun. Part of this could have been blamed on the belt I was wearing, but it was just falling forward. The Kydex holsters were surprisingly comfortable, although I felt it was a tad too bulky. My favorite was a Kydex/leather holster called Galco King Tuck. It fit inside of my jeans and clipped over my belt to help keep it in place. It fit nicely in the small of my back and would easily conceal a 9mm handgun.

TIP: To help break in a leather holster, add leather conditioner to the inside of the holster. Wrap your UNLOADED handgun in saran wrap and work in and out over and over again.

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This Kydex holster is held up by my belt. Didn’t fall forward like the fully leather holsters, but did sag a little bit.

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This was one of the leather holsters that I did like. It clipped to the inside of my jeans. It was extremely comfortable and laid close on my abdomen.

Below are photos of the Galco King Tuk (my favorite holster of the night). I took photos of the holster with and without a gun, just to give a better idea of how it fits into the back of my jeans.IMG_1207 IMG_1206 IMG_1204 IMG_1202I then went over to the shoulder holsters that were laid out. I had thought about purchasing a shoulder holster in the past for when I want to carry during winter months. However, once it was held up and we put it on, I noticed that the gun in the holster points backwards. At first, this wouldn’t seem like too much of a big deal, except this means that you’re gun is pointing at people behind you. One of the first rules you learn when shooting is to always keep the gun pointed in a safe direction.
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The next holster I tried on was an ankle holster. I wouldn’t necessarily use this as my primary weapon, but it would definitely be a good back-up. The instructor also brought up the point that this would be easier to access in the event that you’re sitting in a car or laying on the ground during an attack.

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The next couple of holsters I tried on were different style ‘belly belts’. They kind of reminded me of an ace bandage. Although they were extremely comfortable, having velcro hold my handgun up makes me a little uneasy.

Next, I looked over a table of purses made for concealed carry. Built-in holsters and removable holsters were both options. I’ve always been hesitant about purses because people can easily take them from you. If an attacker demands your purse, you are left either unarmed and/or having to call the police to inform them that a criminal now has your handgun (that’s assuming you didn’t have your phone in your purse).

In the event that you would prefer to carry in your purse, the instructor recommended using a revolver because the slide won’t catch on any fabric and you can continue to shoot.

The last one we spoke over was a thigh holster. We were advised to always place the holster on the inside of your non-dominant leg. This makes it easy to grab and easier to conceal. (If gun was placed on the outside on your dominant leg, you will have a gun print showing through your dress).

An important thing to remember when you’re considering to carry a concealed handgun is to keep it with you 100% of the time. Practice how to draw from your holster and get comfortable wearing it. The meeting was extremely informative and I really enjoyed looking into all of the different options. To end the evening, we grabbed our guns and filled the lanes. It never hurts to get a couple rounds of target practice in!

Questions Asked About Gun Ownership

One of the greatest joys in life is when your best friend starts to take interest in something you find so very important. The even greater joy is when they come to you for advice.

A couple of years ago, my friend Allison and I were attending a university in Huntsville, TX. I don’t know what any of you know about Huntsville, but most people you ask respond with “isn’t that the place with all the prisons?”. Yes. Yes it is. Huntsville, TX is where this nation’s criminals get transferred before they’re executed. Sounds like a great place, doesn’t it? The city is literally surrounded by about 9 different prisons. You can imagine how frightening it is to hear when someone escapes (which they do on a yearly basis) or when you hear that someone has been released. Because of this, you learn to trust your instincts and gain the knowledge that if someone appears to be up to no good, it’s usually because they are.

We had a couple of experiences where we were legitimately worried for our safety walking around campus at night or coming home late from work. One incident in particular, we ended up finding a University Police call station to call for help. The man on the other end was laughing and carrying on conversation with his co-workers while we were trying to tell him what was happening. We ended up repeating ourselves several times AND it took them over 20 minutes to get to us. Had we not felt helpless, things would have gone differently. This is why I encourage women, on college campuses or not, to get a gun.

My friend has recently graduated and will be moving to Houston. A place in which she feels she would be much more comfortable living if she was able to carry. She came to me with a few questions and I decided to share them with you:

Questions

1. What is the first thing you should do when beginning to consider owning a gun?
  • Do your research. Look into classes in your area. I highly recommend NRA’s First Steps Pistol courses. You can even do a women’s only course! This will give you a chance to learn about gun safety, maintenance, and you’ll have someone with you during your first time at the range. These instructors can also help you find what you’re looking for depending on why you want a gun. They will ask you questions and figure out your preferences to help you find what you’re looking for. This can also help address many of the concerns that people have when considering getting a gun. Please don’t ever purchase a gun without knowing how to use it. This could be extremely dangerous to you and those around you. Wait until after you feel physically and emotionally prepared to own a firearm.
2. How many times at a gun range do you think it would take to start to feel comfortable with a gun?
  • It really depends on the person. I was into my 3rd time when I really felt comfortable. My 1st time was nice and easy because I had an instructor with me. The 2nd time was really nerve-wrecking. I wasn’t sure what to say to the lady at the counter, I was nervous because there were a lot of other gun owners in the room, and I felt pressure because I wanted to be as good as the other shooters. The third time, I was much more at ease. I knew exactly what to say, went up to my station, loaded everything up and went at it. Some people take a little more time, depending on how comfortable they’ve gotten with their gun on their own time. For example, when I first purchased my gun, I sat at my dining room table and took it apart and put it back together over and over and over again. The first time was REALLY hard because I refused to cheat and look at the manual. I wanted to know exactly what to do. Now I can take it apart and reassemble it with my eyes closed in about 15 seconds. When you get comfortable with the mechanics, you feel comfortable shooting it because you took the power away from the gun. It no longer has control over you. The fear is gone because you no longer go “what happens if I do _______?” going through your head every time you pick it up. You’ll know what happens when you push that button or unlock the safety. You’ll have full control. With people like my mom, she was given the gun already loaded and told to shoot. She doesn’t know what to do with it once it’s empty. So, if your instructor wants to set everything up for you, let them do it the first couple of times and then ask to take over. Have them walk you through the steps.
3. Who should be aware of you owning a gun?
  • People you trust and people who will be around the gun. Everyone in the whole world doesn’t need to know you have one. The less people who know, the better. If a criminal knows that you have a gun, they can be prepared. If they don’t, then they’re in for one hell of a surprise. Family members who live in the same household should also know (except if you have someone who you believe it mentally unstable). Family may be intimidated or afraid at first, but once you get comfortable you can help them get comfortable with the idea and then encourage them to take safety courses as well. You can also explain to them what the benefits are of having a gun, why you feel you need one, and answer any questions they have.
4. Guns are expensive and so are bullets. Besides that what are other expenses that come with a gun?
  • There are a lot of unnecessary (but fun) accessories you can buy, but the main things you will have to worry about are cleaning supplies, range supplies (eye and ear protection), storage, and ammo. How often you need to purchase cleaning supplies will depend on how often you use your gun. You can purchase this from Wal-Mart, sports and outdoors stores, and sometimes even the range. In your introduction to class, you will be taught what supplies to use and how to use them. As for eye and ear protection, spend the money on quality. The last thing you want to do is damage your hearing or sight. Ranges do have rentals that you can use while you’re there, but they aren’t always the greatest. For storage, purchase something that you can keep out of reach from other people. You will also need it in order to transport the guns. Gun locks and safes are always a great way to go. Remember, the safety on your handgun should never be assumed to work, so have backup.gun locks
5. How often should you practice shooting and is there a continuing of education with guns and gun safety?
  • I would make it a monthly obligation to practice your shooting. You can never be too prepared. You can also never be too educated. There are plenty of opportunities to continue education and learn more about gun handling. The NRA offers tons of courses. You can look into group classes, clubs or organizations, legal courses, self-defense courses, and when things get too easy for you, try looking into stimulation courses. I have found a few places here in the area that I can go to and play our real scenarios. This would be an excellent way for me to test my response to stressful situations and how I would handle myself. The levels of difficulty increase, so you’ll always have some new way to practice. You can also look into concealed carry courses and/or testing to be an instructor.

Getting a gun is a huge responsibility and like any other thing you’ll take on, practice makes perfect.

What questions do you have about purchasing/owning a gun?

Shooting at the ranch: Family bonding at its finest

4 hours and 700 rounds later, it’s safe to say I had a good day.

My grandpa, my brother, and I drove out to my uncle’s ranch and began to unpack. With us we had a Beretta PX4 Storm 9mm (mine), a 9mm Beretta M9, a .22 Ruger semi-auto, a Keltec .380, and a Ruger Vaguer .45 single action revolver with a swing gate to load and unload. Though the .45 cal revolver was a REALLY nice gun, I was pretty horrible at shooting it, but man was it a beauty!

Throughout the day, my family members snapped some shots so I could share my experience with you.

Obviously, I was most comfortable with my own gun. My next favorite was the other Beretta. Everyone else seemed to have shot it too high or too low, but I was right on the money with this one. Not a surprise to me, Berettas were what I learned on. 

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This target was after my first few shots using the Beretta M-9. With the .22, the 9mm, and the .45, we shot from between 7 and 10 yards. We had to get a little creative because it was crazy muddy after we drove the truck out there. (Sorry my target pictures are sideways).

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Me holding the Ruger .22

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Here is me holding my favorite out of my grandpa’s collection, the Beretta M-9.

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 Final picture is of me holding the .45 revolver.

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This is my target shooting with the .45. I hit a few on the target but that took some getting used to. Most of what I shot was too low. Oh well, I guess I’ll just have to practice more!

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Finally, to wrap up the day, I picked up a Keltec .380. I have to say, this gun was far from my favorite. It is very snappy and hurt my thumb. Obviously it is not a target practice gun and would get the job done in a self-defense situation, but shooting this all day would not be fun at all.

DSCN1037  So I went back to my Beretta and decided to tear up one final target. 

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Selecting A Handgun: Women’s Perspective

I think it’s a pretty decent video for women who are looking to purchase a handgun. It’s always good to do your research to figure out exactly what you’re looking for. Also, ALWAYS shoot the gun before you purchase it. Most shooting ranges will have rentals that you can use to make sure that the gun you are shooting is comfortable for you.

Why Liberals Are In The Wrong Mindset About Guns

Ronald Reagan once said:

It isn’t so much that liberals are ignorant. It’s just that they know so many things that aren’t so.

Whenever I look at current research, surveys, similar past laws, current laws, etc I ask myself “why don’t liberals get it? I mean the information is all there!” I believe the truth is that liberals are constantly being fed falsified information to support an agenda. If you feel that you know everything already, why would you feel the need to look at research, journals, history, or past/present/future laws? 

I think about why I started this blog in the first place. Moving from Texas to the DC area was a huge change for me. I wasn’t used to homeless men threatening to shoot me and my family on the street in the middle of the day if we didn’t give him money (might I add, he finished this sentence with “Merry Christmas”). I wasn’t used to hearing about shootings or how crime rates are increasing. I wasn’t used to hearing about violent break-ins. I wasn’t used to the fear that sweeps over me every time I walk to my car by myself at night after meeting my husband for dinner. Fact of the matter is, I wanted to know that in a dangerous situation, I could rely on more than a can of mace to protect myself. 

Once I came to the conclusion that I should get a gun and learn proper gun safety, I then started to gain interest in current events pertaining to guns. But what if I was a liberal? What if I had liberal parents, liberal grandparents, and a liberal husband? What if from day 1, I had it engraved in my brain that guns were dangerous? In that case, I wouldn’t have looked into owning a gun as means to protect myself. Which would mean that I wouldn’t have gained interest in current laws and wouldn’t be the gun advocate that I am today. What’s the difference between me and that liberal? I didn’t assume that my prior knowledge of guns was correct. In fact, my research and follow-up has only further validated my previous claims that guns are for protection.

When I said “I want to get a gun”, it was natural to me because I was in that mindset based on previous/current knowledge. Liberals come from a different background or mindset and believe whole-heartedly that guns are not safe. Why? Because every time there is a tragedy, anti-gun advocates blame the gun instead of the shooter, which in turn puts fear in the hearts of people who are not well-informed. And because people FEAR guns, they aren’t willing to do research to validate statements they hear from people like Obama and Feinstein.

The main reason for this blog is because I want to share research findings and compare current events to that of past ones in a way that makes freedom to own and carry easy to digest. Along the way I choose to provide entertaining videos and stories to show you that guns aren’t dangerous in the hands of law-abiding citizens, so why take them away from them? Along the way, I take emails, comments, and tweets to heart because I can’t change your opinion if I don’t understand where you’re coming from. 

What do you, the gun control advocate, have to say about research findings showing that stricter gun control laws increase gun-related crimes?

Have you, the gun control advocate, ever learned how to properly shoot a gun and took courses to educate yourself of gun safety?

How will laws restricting law-abiding citizens from owning/carrying a gun stop criminals from conducting in mass shootings like Aurora or the elementary school in Newton?

If you don’t know how to answer these questions, how can you continue to stand up against something that you cannot logically defend? Shootings like this cause anger, heartache, frustration, confusion, sadness. These are all emotion-based and do not void the fact the research shows that stricter gun laws increase gun-related crime. 

Basing your arguments on emotion rather than logic and fact does not put you in the proper mindset. Educate yourselves and review the data that Obama and other anti-gun advocates want to keep from you. Maybe then you will see that law-abiding citizens are not the problem. 

Victim of Attempted Robbery Leaves Attackers Wounded and Arrested

A Jet’s Pizza delivery driver in Redford, MI found himself protecting his life around 11 PM on Saturday night when two attackers attempted to rob him at gunpoint. Luckily, the delivery driver had a gun of his own.

According to the police reports, the victim was making a delivery to a residence in Grayfield when he encountered to individuals posing as customers. One grabbed him while the other pointed a gun at him, demanding money. The delivery driver, who was also armed (LEGALLY), then fired a couple of shots towards the attacker. The two robbers then fled the scene to a waiting vehicle while the delivery driver ran to his own vehicle and dialed 911. A couple of hours later, Clarence Sanders, 27, arrived at the hospital with multiple gun shot wounds. On Monday, Sanders was arrainged at the hospital on a charge of armed robbery and the driver of the get-away car was arrested. A warrant for arrest is currently under process for the second attacker.

 

Now that you have the story, I want to take a second and further encourage citizens to own and carry. This situation could have ended horribly for the delivery boy had he NOT BEEN ARMED. He LAWFULLY possessed a firearm which in turn, saved his life and but an armed robber in prison. Did he KILL the attacker? No, but he sure didn’t take the fall for it himself.

Truth is, no one knows when things like this are going to happen. Regardless of whether you know it or not, THESE THINGS DO HAPPEN and they could very well happen to you. Disarming citizens who lawfully possess a firearm and don’t choose to abuse it are not the problem when it comes to gun violence, criminals are. If you really want to prevent gun violence, educate yourselves and your families. The only way to prevent gun violence is to take a stand against violent criminals and learn how to properly defend yourself in a threatening situation. Don’t let your families walk into a situation like this and become a victim of a violent/deadly crime.

As for all the criminals and thugs out there, be careful. Your victims are packing.

Biggest Gun Fails

And this my friends is why you see me mention gun safety in just about every post. Serious accidents could have resulted from each and every one of these videos, assuming they hadn’t already. If you want to shoot or own a gun, great and I encourage you to, BUT (and it’s a BIG but) EDUCATE YOURSELF. Learn about guns, including the proper ways to hold them, load/unload, and fire them. Also, don’t be afraid to start off small and work your way up. Recoil can be a scary thing if you don’t know what to expect. Also, DO NOT just give your gun to a friend/family member/spouse to “try”. It’s not a toy so don’t treat it as such. 

Finally, practice proper grips. If you don’t want to gun to fly out of your hand, smack you in the face, or knock you off your feet, then get a firm grip and know how to hold it. Holding a shotgun down by your hip is not the proper way to shoot. Holding a handgun sideways with one hand or down by your belly button with bent elbows is not the way to hold it. 

Accidents happen because people aren’t willing to learn the right way or their friends don’t know enough themselves to teach proper gun safety. It’s people like this that give RESPONSIBLE gun owners (and yes there is a difference) a very very bad name. 

What do you do to ensure your loved ones are well informed?